Monday, September 15, 2014

DA Legwarmers

I attended my local junior college for my continued education and every semester I would take a dance class of some sort to keep my motivated and get my exercise. For the majority of the semesters I would choose the same instructor. She was energetic, motivating, fun and graceful in her own way.  Throughout the years I was there I took note of her style, and in my last semester I decided to knit her a pair of legwarmers. She always supported my knitting, letting me share projects and events with the class, so it seemed only right so pass on a piece of my work to her.

The design is a series of continuous cables to signify her everlasting energy, and her elegance of movement.

DA Legwarmers
($3.00 pattern)


Celtic Cable Gloves

I designed this pattern as the next step from my free pattern, With a Twist of Mustard. With a longer length and more complex cables, you're bound to master the art of cables. None the less, it's a fairly quick, satisfying knit!

Celtic Cable Gloves
($5.00 pattern)




Winter's Tree

UPDATE: This pattern has been updated as of 9.15.2014. Due to several complaints of ambiguity, I have tried to improve the pattern. Please let me know if it needs any additional changes.

Originally inspired by Buttony Sweater by Katie Marcus, the design of Winter's Pine and Winter's Oak (combined to create "Winter's Tree") is a modern, yet simple sweater. The off center buttons and asymmetrical collar give it an edgy look, but with the form fit design element, it makes it classy and elegant. I first used a variegated yarn by Malabrigo (Winter's Pine version) of which was so yummy to knit with! My only issue was that it pills like crazy, and that drives me mad. So the second time around (Winter's Oak) I used Rowan Alpaca Cotton.  This sweater can be knit with one color, two or even more! The pattern below is that of Winter's Oak,  but it can easily be altered to fit your own vision. Enjoy!




 
Materials:
·  6 (6, 7, 7, 8) skeins Rowan Alpaca Cotton (Brazil 403); 1 skein Rowan Alpaca Cotton (Rice 400); 148 yds per skein (this is the yarn used for the sweater in brown and white) OR 6 (6, 6, 7, 7) Malabrigo Worsted; 210 yds per skein (this yarn is the yarn used for the sweater in variegated dark greens)
·   Size US8 Circular 32”+
·  Size US10 Circular 16” or US10 DPNs (whichever you’re more comfortable with)
·  Stitch markers
Sizes: 
·   Bust: 34 (36, 38, 40, 42)
·   Finished Bust: 37 (39, 41, 43, 45) – allows for a nice fit with shirts underneath +1.5 -2” for buttons
·   Finished Length: 23.5” (24, 25, 25.5, 26)
Gauge:
4.75stitches per inch
 6rows per inch 

Abbreviations & Techniques:
  RS = right side
  WS = wrong side
  PM = place marker
   s1 = slip one; insert needle into stitch as if to purl and slip to right needle, yarn in front
  k2tog = knit 2 stitches together
  ssk = slip slip knit; slip first stitch knit-wise, second stitch knit-wise and insert left needle into front of 2 slipped stitches, knit 2 together
  p2tog = purl 2 stitches together
  p2tog tbl = purl 2 together through back loop; coming from the back of the work, purl stitches together (a very difficult technique to describe by words – if you’re able to watch a video, or refer to a photo, it’ll save your life!)
  m1L = make one left; pick up line between two stitches by inserting left needle front to back and knit the stitch through the back loop
  m1LP = make one left purl side; pick up line between two stitches by inserting left needle back to front and purl the stitch normal
  m1rP = make one right purl side; pick up line between two stitches by inserting left needle front to back and purl the stitch through the back loop
  m1r = make one right; pick up line between two stitches by inserting left needle back to front and knit the stitch normal
  WT = wrap and turn work; if on knit side bring yarn to front, slip stitch knit-wise bring yarn to back slip purl-wise, turn work – if on purl side bring yarn to back slip stitch purl-wise bring yarn to front slip stitch purl-wise and turn work
  Picking up wraps = Knit side – lift wrap from under and place on needle behind the stitch that it was wrapped and knit them together through the back loops; Purl side – lift wrap from the RS of work and place on needle untwisted and p2tog


CO 175 (185, 195, 205, 215) with MC using 2x1 ribbed long tail cast on method and size 8 needle
Rows 1-3, & 6: Complete a 2x1 rib (k2, p1) in MC ending with k1(k2, -, k1, k2) (each size isn’t perfectly divisible by 3, so you’ll have an extra stitch or two at the end of the row depended on the size.)
Rows 4, 5, 7, & 8: Complete a 2x1 rib in CC ending with k1(k2, -, k1, k2)
Continue ribbing as noted about with MC only until total ribbed edge is approximately 3 (3, 4, 4.5, 5) inches or until desired length.
Begin decreases (side shaping) as follows (dec. 4st every 5 rows 7x):
Row 1: s1 k36 (38, 41, 44, 47), ssk, PM, k1, PM, k2tog, k75 (81, 85, 89, 93), ssk, PM, k1, PM, k2tog, k49 (51, 54, 57, 60), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 2 & 4: s1, purl to end of row (EOR)
Rows 3 & 5: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 6: s1, p51 (53, 56, 59, 62), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl (<-- this may be confusing you, refer to abbreviations page!), p73 (79, 83, 87, 91), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p36 (38, 41, 44, 47)
Rows 7 & 9: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 8 & 10: s1, purl to EOR
Row 11: s1, k34 (36, 39, 42, 45), ssk, k1, k2tog, k71 (77, 81, 85, 89), ssk, k1, k2tog, k47 (49, 52, 55, 58), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 12 & 14: s1, purl to EOR
Rows 13 & 15: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 16: s1, p49 (51, 54, 57, 60), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p69 (75, 79, 83, 87), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p34 (36, 39, 42, 45)
Rows 17 & 19: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 18 & 20: s1, purl to EOR
Row 21: s1, k32 (34, 37, 40, 43), ssk, k1, k2tog, k67 (73, 77, 81, 85), ssk, k1, k2tog, k45 (47, 50, 53, 56), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 22 & 24: s1, purl to EOR
Rows 23 & 25: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 26: s1, p47 (49, 52, 55, 58), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p65 (71, 75, 79, 83), p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p32 (34, 37, 40, 43)
Rows 27 & 29: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 28 & 30: s1, purl to EOR
Row 31: s1, k30 (32, 35, 38, 41), ssk, k1, k2tog, k63 (69, 73, 77, 81), ssk, k1, k2tog, k43 (45, 48, 51, 54), p1, k1, p1, k1
Knit in stockinette st. for 3 (3, 3.5, 3.5, 3.75) inches being sure to continue edging pattern on the RS rows only (knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1). End with a WS row. You can hold the sweater around you to test fit. You should be just above waist (smallest part of torso). Make alterations as needed – knit more or less as everyone’s body is different!
Begin increases as follows (inc. 4st every 5 rows 6x):
Row 1: s1, k31 (33, 36, 39, 42), m1r, k1, m1L, k65 (71, 75, 79, 83), m1r, k1, k1L, k44 (46, 49, 52, 55), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 2 & 4: s1, purl to EOR
Rows 3 & 5: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 6: s1, p48 (50, 53, 56, 59), m1rP, p1, m1LP, p67 (73, 77, 81, 85), m1rP, p1, m1LP, p33 (35, 38, 41, 44)
Rows 7 & 9: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 8 & 10: s1, purl to EOR
Row 11: s1, k33 (35, 38, 41, 44), m1r, k1, m1L, k69 (75, 79, 83, 87), m1r, k1, m1L, k46 (48, 51, 54, 57), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 12 & 14: s1, purl to EOR
Rows 13 & 15: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 16: s1, p50 (52, 55, 58, 61), m1rP, p1, m1LP, p71 (77, 81, 85, 89), m1rP, p1, m1LP, p35 (37, 40, 43, 46)
Rows 17 & 19: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 18 & 20: s1, purl to EOR
Row 21: s1, k35 (37, 40, 43, 46), m1r, k1, m1L, k73 (79, 83, 87, 91), m1r, k1, m1L, k48 (50, 53, 56, 59), p1, k1, p1, k1
Rows 22 & 24: s1, purl to EOR
Rows 23 & 25: s1, knit until 4 sts remain, p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 26: s1, p52 (54, 57, 60, 63), m1rP, p1, m1LP, p75 (81, 85, 89, 93), m1rP, p1, m1Lp, p37 (39, 42, 45, 48)
You should have 4 less stitches than you CO with – 171 (181, 191, 201, 211)
Knit until total piece measures 17 (18, 19, 20, 21) inches and place all stitches on hold using waste yarn. This is a good time to wrap the sweater around you to see if you need to knit more or less. Sweater should reach right up to under arm.


Sleeves (knit in the round):
Using a provisional CO, cast on 36 (38, 40, 42, 44) stitches with a size US 10 needle (CO more stitches for a looser fit). Place a marker at the beginning of your round.
Knit in a 2x1 rib for 3”; switch to a size US 8 needle and continue for another 1.5”
Transition round from cuff to rest of sleeve: ssk, k1, k2tog, k13 (14, 15, 16, 17), ssk, k1, k2tog, knit to EOR
Knit in stockinette stitch for 1”
Increase 2sts every 9th row 5x as follows:
Round 1: k1, m1L, knit until 1 stitch before end of round, m1R k1
Rounds 2-9: knit
Repeat rounds 1 through 9 four more times.
Increase 2sts every 7th row in the same manner as above for a total of 5 times.
You should have 52 (54, 56, 58, 60) sts
Knit in stockinette stitch until sleeve measures 17 (17.5, 18.5, 19.5, 20.5)” – try on to make sure it reaches right to the crease of the armpit. It shouldn’t come up over the shoulder yet.
Place stitches on hold and cut yarn leaving an 8” tail.
Repeat this for the other sleeve and place these stitches on hold as well.

Note: As this was one of my first patterns – the first attempt (the dark green) was done with the drop shoulder technique. The second (brown and white) was done using the raglan sleeve  technique. I’ve found the raglan to produce a more satisfying fit, so I’ve written the pattern accordingly. 

Attaching sleeves to body:
Note: Remove any markers as you come to them.
Begin to re-thread your needles through the body piece (RS facing you rethread from right to left) until you reach 6 (6, 6, 7, 7) sts before your first marker (this will make your front right) – place the next 12 (12, 12, 14, 14) sts on hold from body piece. Pick up all but the inside 12 (12, 12, 14, 14) sts from one sleeve (that will remain on hold – your increases should mark the center of these sts), and continue to pick up the body stitches (back side) until you reach 6 (6, 6, 7, 7) sts before first marker on backside (back left) – place the next 12 (12, 12, 14, 14) sts on hold. Pick up all but the inside 12 (12, 12, 14, 14) sts (will remain on hold) from sleeve and pick up the remaining stitches on body (front left).
Join in new yarn.
 Knit 1 row, slipping the 1st stitch
Purl 1 row, slipping the 1st stitch
227 (241, 255, 261, 275) sts should be on the needle.

 

Shoulder Shaping (raglan):
Row 1 (RS): s1, k24 (27, 30, 32, 35), ssk, PM, k2, PM, k2tog, k34 (36, 37, 37, 39), ssk, PM, k2, PM, k2tog, k66 (70, 75, 77, 81), ssk, PM, k2, PM, k2tog, k34 (36, 37, 37, 39), ssk, PM, k2, PM, k2tog, k40 (43, 47, 49, 52), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 2: s1, purl to EOR
Row 3: s1, k23 (26, 29, 31, 34), ssk, k2, k2tog, k32 (34, 35, 35, 37), ssk, k2, k2tog, k64 (68, 73, 75, 79), ssk, k2, k2tog, k32 (34, 35, 35, 37), ssk, k2, k2tog, k39 (42, 46, 48, 51), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 4: s1, purl to EOR
Row 5: s1 k22 (25, 28, 30, 33) ssk, k2, k2tog, k30 (32, 33, 33, 35), ssk, k2, k2tog, k62 (66, 71, 73, 77), ssk, k2, k2tog, k30 (32, 33, 33, 35), ssk, k2, k2tog, k38 (41, 45, 47, 50), p1 k1, p1, k1
Row 6: s1, purl to EOR
Row 7: s1, k21 (24, 27, 29, 32), ssk, k2, k2tog, k28 (30, 31, 31, 33), ssk, k2, k2tog, k60 (64, 69, 71, 75), ssk, k2, k2tog, k28 (30, 31, 31, 33), ssk, k2, k2tog, k37 (40, 44, 46, 49), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 8: s1, purl to EOR
Row 9: s1, k20 (23, 26, 28, 31), ssk, k2, k2tog, k26 (28, 29, 29, 31), ssk, k2, k2tog, k58 (62, 67, 69, 73), ssk, k2, k2tog, k26 (28, 29, 29, 31), ssk, k2, k2tog, k36 (39, 43, 45, 48), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 10: s1, purl to EOR
Row 11: s1, k19 (22, 25, 27, 30), ssk, k2, k2tog, k24 (26, 27, 27, 29), ssk, k2, k2tog, k56 (60, 65, 67, 71), ssk, k2, k2tog, k24 (26, 27, 27, 29), ssk, k2, k2tog, k35 (38, 42, 44, 47), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 12: s1, purl to EOR
Row 13: s1, k18 (21, 24, 26, 29), ssk, k2, k2tog, k22 (24, 25, 25, 27), ssk, k2, k2tog, k54 (58, 63, 65, 69), ssk, k2, k2tog, k22 (24, 25, 25, 27), ssk, k2, k2tog, k34 (37, 41, 43, 46), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 14: s1, purl to EOR
Row 15: s1, k17 (20, 23, 25, 28), ssk, k2, k2tog, k20 (22, 23, 23, 25), ssk, k2, k2tog, k52 (56, 61, 63, 67), ssk, k2, k2tog, k20 (22, 23, 23, 25), ssk, k2, k2tog, k33 (36, 40, 42, 45), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 16: s1, purl to EOR
Row 17: s1, k16 (19, 22, 24, 27), ssk, k2, k2tog, k18 (20, 21, 21, 23), ssk, k2, k2tog, k50 (54, 59, 61, 65), ssk, k2, k2tog, k18 (20, 21, 21, 23), ssk, k2, k2tog, k32 (34, 38, 40, 44), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 18: s1, purl to EOR
Row 19: s1, k15 (18, 21, 23, 26), ssk, k2, k2tog, k16 (18, 19, 19, 21), ssk, k2, k2tog, k48 (52, 57, 59, 63), ssk, k2, k2tog, k16 (18, 19, 19, 21), ssk, k2, k2tog, k31 (33, 37, 39, 43), p1, k1, p1, k1
Row 20: s1, purl to EOR
You should now have 80 less stitches.

Back Shaping:
 Knit until 4st before back left marker WT
purl until 3st before back right marker WT
*knit until 2st before last wrapped st WT
purl until 2st before last wrapped st WT*
Repeat last two rows
Knit across picking up wraps (3) until  2nd to last st before back left marker WT
 purl picking up wraps (3) until 2nd to last stitch before marker WT
 knit across picking in the last knit wrapped stitch and knit all the way across
Purl back picking up last wrapped stitch
 Knit in stockinette stitch for 2 (2, 4, 4, 4) rows

Collar:
Complete 2x1 ribbing for 3” ending with a RS row (ready to knit a WS row). 
RS row: *k2, p1* to EOR (Note: Your size may not end up with a divisible by 3 number for the collar, that’s okay, just knit the extra stitch or two at the end of the row.)
WS row:
If you ended your RS row with a k1, then you will do p1, *k1, p2* to EOR.
If you ended your RS row with a knit 2, then you will do p2, *k1, p2* to EOR
If you ended your RS row with a p1, then you will do *k1, p2* to EOR

We are now going to be doing a 2x1 ribbing on the WS (which will become the right side when folded). Do exactly what you did above, but reverse.
BO the 12st from sleeve and under the arms using a three needle BO from the inside of your garment.
Add button holes to your liking using the Japanese technique - whipstitch a hole wherever you want your buttons – or use any technique you like!
Sew up the holes at the underarms and sew in all your ends!
Wet block and lay flat to dry for a day or two.


Copyright 2011, Alisha Bright. All Rights Reserved.

It's Been a While

After a year and a half, I've managed to get my butt over here and update! 

I stayed on the farm until mid-April of 2013. I made my way up to Canada, with a boy who I'd met back home and had come to visit me, where I was proposed to! (Eeeee!) And then back home I went. 

I did however, in the days before I left the farm, learn how to dye a skein of yarn with koolaid...



 ...And shear an angora rabbit.




Once we returned home, I fell back into the busy routine of work. I have since managed to publish 2 designs.
Celtic Cable Gloves
DA Legwarmers 

But more than anything I've been busy with an amazing thing called "family". 

These photos will explain it all!






So naturally, I spent the majority of my knitting time while pregnant knitting things for my son! 

I managed to spin some yarn for a blanket I knit him:



Three and a half months after his birth, we got married! And of course I had to knit myself a wedding shawl. It's originally the Rock Island Shawl by Jared Flood, but as I always do, I had to make my own changes.  I added beads to the bottom border and continued the lace for several more repeats.


So there's good reason I haven't managed to update this in a while! Now that I'm not planning a wedding and have settled into motherhood a bit, I'm hoping to get some unpublished designs out and perhaps design some more.

Happy knitting!

Saturday, April 6, 2013

Discovering New Things

So after a little over a month of being on the farm, I offer you... YARN!

These are my first two skeins of yarn! The one on the right is my very first one! It's a 2-ply bulky, spun using a drop spindle and fleece from the sheep here on the farm! The left was my first skein on the big-girl wheel! Also a 2-ply, but I practiced spinning much more thin and consistent. The wheel I used is called a Sleeping Beauty (cute!) and is a single treadle, double-drive.


I've just finished my second piece on the spinning wheel. It's still in the process of drying! It's a 3-ply spun from combed top produced by a company called Brown Sheep. There was some stuff laying around that I was able to snatch up and get more practice with! One of the main differences between the two up above and the one below is that the first two I prepped from start to finish (okay... minus the shearing since I've yet to do that). The one below is a pre-prepped and (maybe?) dyed, combed nicely with no VM (as it's called in the fiber world - referring to vegetable matter like hay, sticks, etc). People call this stuff "spinning with butter!" since its so smooth and sleek, slides right off your hands and onto the wheel. 


Okay, so you want to know that I (me, Alisha...) am actually the one producing this yarn, right? Well here ya go! I don't have a photo on the wheel, but here's the drop spindle. WEEEE!

So what have I been doing other than letting wool slide through my fingers into my own yarn (eeek!)? Well, one is lots of adventuring around the area seeing beautiful views!

Seabeck

 Buck Lake

 Solduc

Somewhere along 101 way north!
 La Push (you mean where Twilight was!? Yes..)

 Hurricane Ridge

And something you may or may not know... I may be into cars just a little... So a car meet one day, and adventuring to the mountains the next!




And the other thing I've gotten the chance to do is visit some other farms and meet more animals!! 

Holding a nubian/alpine baby goat! Only a few days old and SO soft.


His name is Blue Eyes. He's a cashmere/angora goat.

These are some fashionable sheep! Jacob is what their breed is called.

Hi there ladies! They decided to follow me around the pasture - even after their owner gave them new hay.

This guy was cool! Apparently he's not a super people person, and often times he'll butt you for food. Well, he came right up to me, I knelt down (little did I know in a patch of stinging nettles!) and we were face to face. Too cute!

This... is Big Boy! His fleece was SUPER long!
 I can't help but giggle every time I see him or his photos and I hope you giggle with happiness too.

And to end you for now, I am enjoying my first cup of goats milk..chocolate milk! (from the farm) with the tulip I bought at my first Farmer's Market here in Washington today!